Archive for the “Street Fighter the Storytelling Game” Category

This table shows the approximate chances of botch/failure/success by degree on multiple d10 throws, for the benefit of the numbercrunching munchkin, calculated for between 1 and 9 dice. Also patterned are the rates at difficulty 7 through 10, showing the bizarre results arising from the White Wolf system when one of these difficulties is thrown in by a Storyteller to reflect a difficult task. Note the increasing odds of a botch near the beginning of the curve.

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This is a collection of NPC’s for illustrative purposes. Note that most of these are NOT serious roleplaying characters, but sarcastic examples of rules exploitation to watch out for as a GM or player. Also includes 2 versions of my long-running hapless player character.

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Combos in Street Fighter give a character a certain amount of uniqueness. They can also be numbercrunched to pieces to give the fighter every possible advantage. Here are some notes and observations on Combos which you may find helpful when considering your fighter’s career track.

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The inane argument of "Which style is the best?" is almost as prevalent in Street Fighter as it is in real life. The big difference is, in real life some styles do have quantifiable advantages over others in certain circumstances, and there are in fact some styles that you would quickly dismiss as viable options for a realistic combat system. In the Street Fighter Storytelling Game, the all-overpowering concept of game balance mandates that there be no superior style, or even styles no one would ever take, because it subtracts from variety and interest in the gaming experience if everyone eventually just practices Uber Style X and uses Maneuver Y.

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This is an article I wrote a really long time ago (circa 1997 or so) for the long defunct online publication Sphere. It raised a lot more spiteful flaming when someone reprinted it to usenet than when it was actually on Sphere, which amused me greatly. It’s reprinted here as part of the SFSTG section of the site, and for its commentary on the nature of roleplaying, gamemastering, and those LARP weirdos.

Many thanks to Steve Karstensen, webmaster of Street Fighter Central, for keeping the article up all this time.

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You know something is amiss when the original editor of a game system offers an alternate take on a maneuver that he was not there to edit. He offered this version of the maneuver during some email exchanges a while ago.

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One day, as I was sitting around with absolutely nothing to do and discussing the Street Fighter system with Tony Faber, I realized that just about every single unbalanced thing in Street Fighter is a product of the Players’ Guide. The system as it exists was fairly balanced in the basic rulebook (with one minor exception, the Ear Pop, which I suppose you can balance out with special effects), and even the slew of silly styles introduced in Contenders wasn’t too bad (as long as you stayed away from the amusing but silly Silat Zen No-Mind/Sonic Boom guys), and Secrets of Shadoloo had really interesting material, but the Players’ Guide introduced us to such fantastic numbercrunches as the Animal Hybrid rules, Cyborgs, free damage bonuses for Savate, and everyone’s favorite cheap-ass terrible maneuver, the Cartwheel Kick. I have to wonder who was pretending to playtest these rules.

It seems that the authors of these various styles were not really interested in adding value to the game, but rather they just were pandering to their own "my style is better than your style" syndrome of old chop-socky flicks. A similar thing happens through some of Contenders (i.e. Silat, otherwise known as "Improved Kung Fu", and Jeet Kune Do, also known as "All Crunchy Maneuvers"), but tends to affect their NPC’s more than their styles and game mechanics.

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